Joyce Alexander Wein Prize

Studio Museum in Harlem’s Wein Prize Goes to Diedrick Brackens

Los-Angeles based artist Diedrick Brackens was honured for his deeply thoughtful and innovative approach to textile art, in which he explores the intersections of identity and sociopolitical issues in the United States. His intricate tapestries, based on algorithm, highlight both the complexities of African-American identity and the cultural significance of the loom throughout the world.

Diedrick Brackens, in the decadence of silence, 2018. Cotton and acrylic yarn, 72 x 72 inches (182.9 x 182.9 cm). Courtesy The Studio Museum in Harlem

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On Thursday, October 18, The Studio Museum in Harlem welcomed over 800 artists, cultural leaders, civic leaders, business leaders, and philanthropists to its annual Gala to celebrate the Museum’s historic 50th anniversary and present the thirteenth Joyce Alexander Wein Artist Prize to Los-Angeles based artist Diedrick Brackens.

Introducing Diedrick Brackens and presenting him with the Joyce Alexander Wein Artist Prize, Director and Chief Curator of the studio Musuem Thelma Golden said, “The past winners of this award—many of whom are here with us tonight—include Simone Leigh, Derrick Adams, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Leonardo Drew, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Leslie Hewitt, Jennie C. Jones, Samuel Levi Jones, Glenn Ligon, Nadine Robinson, Gary Simmons, and Lorna Simpson. Tonight we add a new name to that illustrious list—Diedrick Brackens.”

Diedrick Brackens (born 1989, Mexia, Texas) explores the intersections of identity and sociopolitical issues in the United States through an innovative and deeply thoughtful approach to textile art. His intricate tapestries, based on algorithms derived from the histories of African, American, and European weaving, highlight both the complexities of African-American identity and the cultural significance of the loom throughout the world. Brackens received his BFA from the University of North Texas in 2011 and his MFA in textiles from California College of the Arts in 2014. His work has been shown in solo exhibitions at the Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita; Steve Turner Gallery, Los Angeles; and Johansson Projects, Oakland. His work has been included in group exhibitions at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; SOMArts, San Francisco; the Berkeley Art Museum; the 3rd Ghetto Biennale, Port-au-Prince; and the Museum of Geometric Art, Dallas. He has previously been honored with the Barclay Simpson Award from California College of the Arts and an award from the Clare Hart DeGolyer Memorial Fund of the Dallas Museum of Art.

Diedrick Brackens, sleep don’t come easy, 2016. Woven cotton, nylon, and chenille yarn, 61 x 52 inches (154.9 x 132.1 cm). Courtesy the Studio Museum in Harlem

About The Studio Museum in Harlem

Founded in 1968 by a diverse group of artists, community activists and philanthropists, The Studio Museum in Harlem is internationally known for its catalytic role in promoting the work of artists of African descent. As it celebrates its 50th anniversary, the Studio Museum is preparing to construct a new home at its longtime location on Manhattan’s West 125th Street, designed by internationally renowned architect David Adjaye of Adjaye Associates in collaboration with Cooper Robertson. The rst building created expressly for the institution’s program, the new building will enable the Studio Museum to better serve a growing and diverse audience, provide additional educational opportunities for people of all ages, expand its program of world- renowned exhibitions, e ectively display its singular collection and strengthen its trailblazing Artist-in- Residence program.

While the Studio Museum is currently closed in preparation for construction, the Museum has opened Studio Museum 127, a temporary programming space located at 429 West 127th Street, and is working to deepen its roots in the community through inHarlem, a dynamic set of collaborative programs in our neighborhood. The Museum’s groundbreaking exhibitions, thought-provoking conversations, and engaging art-making workshops continue at a variety of partner and satellite locations in Harlem.

 

studiomuseum.org

 

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